Eyre Peninsula fishing spots - Fishing S.A | Fishing in South Australia

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SA FISHING SPOTS
Eyre Peninsula,S.A has some of the most amazing fishing spots you will ever find.I have just listed a few here but you wont be dissapointed if you venture to this part of South Australia the fishing is not only great so is the scenery.
Eyre Peninsula SA fishing spots

Ceduna and the far west coast

Ceduna, Thevenard and Denial Bay are popular fishing destinations. Line or boat fishing is a must at Davenport Creek, if you can find it. It's about 41 kilometres west of Ceduna but the creek is not well signposted and the entrance is at the bottom of giant sand dunes. A four wheel drive (4WD) is required to get there or join a fishing charter from Ceduna.

Further west again, you'll need a four wheel drive (4WD) to explore the beach at Fowlers Bay. There’s salmon, mullet, whiting and mulloway for those who are patient. Fowlers Bay jetty is popular for its big squid, tommy ruff and snook.

Scotts Bay is close to Fowlers and is one of the best salmon beaches in South Australia.

THE sweeping beach that extends from Nantiby to Fowlers jetty is not highly publicised for its mulloway potential, but those who put in the hours pull nice fish from the surf.

Salmon, plenty of big mullet and a few whiting are also found here. You will need a 4WD to explore the beach and it's a great pier for big squid, tommies, snook and mulloway.

Scotts Bay, around the corner from Fowlers, is one of the best salmon beaches in SA.

Lucky Bay and Cowell

You’ll find consistent snapper and whiting at Lucky Bay. Take an aluminium dinghy about three kilometres offshore to where they are. Blue swimmer crabs can be found at nearby Cowell, which is also the place to pick up some fresh oysters or an oyster pie for lunch.

BEFORE the SeaSA ferry began there, Lucky Bay was just a handful of beachside shacks with great fishing and very little publicity.

It's just a short drive from Cowell and produces some of most consistent snapper and whiting action in SA. One of the best things it's possible to catch snapper just 3km offshore, so an aluminium dinghy is all that's required.

The calm waters of the harbour and the variety of fish caught makes Cowell one of the best destinations on the Eyre Peninsula.

The main channel of the harbour is fairly narrow and water really moves through so this movement can be handy for picking a likely spot around it to burley up.

The entrance to the harbour is very productive with a limestone outcrop to the north. This outcrop forms an island on the eastern side of the harbor and has a steep drop off from the rocky shore - ideal place for fish to wait in ambush.

The other side of the chanel (western side) is sandy With sea grass. Between the sea grass and the gradual drop to the channel is also a good fishy area.

Because Franklin harbour is almost enclosed, you can enjoy shelter from much of the large swell that can occur OUTSIDE, it also allows you to shelter from most winds, by simply fishing the lee side of the harbour.

Tumby Bay

Tumby Bay is the gateway to the Sir Joseph Banks Group of Islands. It is a unique marine sanctuary located 12 nautical miles east of Tumby Bay and provides a breeding ground for many seabirds, seals, dolphins and fish. King George whiting and snapper are frequently caught in Tumby Bay.

The District abounds with secluded sandy beaches and rocky headlands. Tumby Bay and Port Neill both have jetties for the land based angler. For the boating enthusiasts both towns have good boat ramps. Above all, get local advice about where they are biting.

A unique marine sanctuary located 12 nautical miles east of Tumby Bay, the Sir Joseph Banks Group of Islands is a breeding ground for a large variety of sea birds, seals, dolphins and fish with King George Whiting the most sought after. This beautiful chain of islands is one of the marine wonders of the world and is a marine conservation park. It offers a range of lovely sheltered bays, golden sandy beaches and reefs teeming with marine life, and a day trip will provide the visitor with a memorable and rewarding experience. Charter boats offer cruises for the sightseeing, fishing and diving enthusiasts.

Snapper, tommy ruff, garfish, flathead, squid, mullet and rock species are all commonly caught in the district.

The District abounds with secluded sandy beaches and rocky headlands. Tumby Bay and Port Neill both have jetties for the land based angler. For the boating enthusiasts both towns have good boat ramps. Above all, get local advice about where they are biting.

A unique marine sanctuary located 12 nautical miles east of Tumby Bay, the Sir Joseph Banks Group of Islands is a breeding ground for a large variety of sea birds, seals, dolphins and fish with King George Whiting the most sought after. This beautiful chain of islands is one of the marine wonders of the world and is a marine conservation park. It offers a range of lovely sheltered bays, golden sandy beaches and reefs teeming with marine life, and a day trip will provide the visitor with a memorable and rewarding experience. Charter boats offer cruises for the sightseeing, fishing and diving enthusiasts.

Snapper, tommy ruff, garfish, flathead, squid, mullet and rock species are all commonly caught in the district.

Coles Point, Greenly Beach and Convention Beach

Go rock fishing at Coles Point. There’s sweep, salmon, snook, trevally, mullet, flathead and King George whiting. If you are really lucky, you may hook a blue groper. It is legal to catch them at Coles Point but you will need some heavy duty tackle.

Nearby, Greenly Beach and Convention Beach both have salmon. Wade through the inshore coves around Coles Point and you may find whiting and mullet.

As with most salmon beaches fish numbers are high with lots fish 3 to 4 kilo.

Two and a half kilometers to the north is the first of the Coles Point beaches. Beach 957 is a 400 m long west facing sand beach, backed by 20 m high bluffs, with a vehicle track leading to the southern bluffs. The beach receives waves averaging up to 1 m, which break across a reef and rock filled 50 m wide surf zone, with a permanent rip draining the surf. On the northern side of the rocks is 600 m long beach 958, a straight west facing beach which receives waves averaging 1 m. These maintain a 50 m wide bar which is usually cut by two beach rips, together with some rocks along the beach. The vehicle track runs along the 20 m high bluffs behind the beach, with no formal foot access. It is bordered by a protruding bluff at the northern end, on the northern side of which is 200 m long beach 959, a pocket of sand, backed by the bluffs and partially fronted by reefs. Bluffs and a rock platform separate it from beach 960, which lies of the southern side of Coles Point. The beach is 500 m long, faces south and curves round slightly under 20 m high bluffs. There are bluff top car parks at either end, with the best access down the steep southern bluff.


Coffin Bay Area

Coffin Bay Area - Fishing without a boat.
Species
Whiting, garfish, salmon trout, tommy ruff, mullet, flathead, trevally sweep, squid, snapper, yellowtail kingfish
Locations
The Town Wharf
Snapper Point Jetty
The beach channel side of boat ramp
Crinolin Point
The Ledge (the other side of the channel)
Mount Dutton Bay Jetty
Beach Fishing
Type of Fishing
Surf, beach and rock fishing
Species
Salmon, whiting, tommy ruff, trevally, sweep, mullet, shark
Locations
Coffin Bay National Park:
Almonta Beach, Point Avoid, Avoid Beach, Yangie Bay, Gunyha Beach (4WD) Convention Beach (4WD), Seven Mile Beach (4WD), Point Sir Isaac (4WD), Black Springs (4WD)
Locations nearby:
Frenchmans Bluff, Point Drummond, Farm Beach, Mount Dutton Bay, Kellidie Bay, Halls Bay
Beach Fishing
Type of Fishing

Boat fishing
Species
Whiting, garfish, salmon trout, mullet, tommy ruff, flathead, snook, trevally, snapper, yellowtail kingfish, squid, sand crabs
Locations
The Channel, Rabbit Island, Goat Island, Seal Corner, The Brothers, Black Springs, Tape weed, Point Longnose, Farm Beach, Gallipoli Beach, The Fenceline, Frenchmans, Point Sir Isaac, White Sandhills, Black Sandhills

Gunyah
With consistent swell from the south-west, Gunyah boasts some good pockets of deeper water close to shore. The salmon fishing can be first class, but by-catch is minimal along here. Winter is the classic bait-fishing window with big tides and generally larger swell. The salmon fishing during winter is consistently good, provided the beach isn’t washed-out with big swells. During summer the fishing can be hit and miss, and often revolves around sight casting to visible schools when the swell is low. The latter is definitely more visually appealing.

The average size of these surf-roaming salmon is in the  2-3kg range, but each year we see a few 5kg fish – awesome salmon from the surf. We try to coincide our beach fishing efforts around the afternoon high tide.

Lock`s well
Locks Well beach is only 15km south of Elliston and is one of the most consistent locations for catches of Australian Salmon in South Australia.

Locks Well beach consistently produces big Australian Salmon. The kind of fish which surf fishermen base their "tall" stories on. Anne Scammell of Elliston Progress and Tourism Association  says  www.elliston.com.au or the Visitor Information Centre on 1800 088 589 provide details.

Locks Well has become so popular the Elliston community built a 120m wooden staircase (282 steps!) to provide easy, safe access to the beach.

A lookout has also been constructed which takes in the magnificent view of the coastline.

The road to Locks Well from the Flinders Highway has also been bitumised, which takes the shakes out of what was corrugated secondary roads.

Port Augusta
The kingfish at Port Augusta are at their peak in July and August, although some good fish are caught from May right through until October. The average size of a Port Augusta kingfish slots into the 15 to 25kg category, with plenty of 30kg+ fish taken as well.
Launching is via the local boat ramp, situated on the western side of town. From here it’s about a 5km run south to where the kingfish are targeted, but a further 5km or so to the livebait grounds. The standard practice at Port Augusta is to fish live squid (which can be caught over the weed beds in front of the shacks on the western side of the Gulf).

Sheringa Beach
Sheringa Beach, just 8km off the Flinders Highway turn off, does not offer road travel comforts, but it has the same calibre in abundance of fish. It also has a magnificent backdrop of big white dunes and provides excellent beach fishing for whiting in many green holes.

To the west good catches of sweep can be taken from the rocks. Well-worn tracks lead to these locations. A little further west the second Sheringa Beach offers surf fishing for salmon at its best.

Sheringa beach (1016) commences at the northern end of the bluffs and sweeps in a slightly curving manner for 3.9 km to the northern calcarenite bluffs, which extends 1 km west of the beach. The entire bay area seaward of the beach is dominated by reefs, which cause wave breaking during high waves and lower waves at the shore to usually less than 1 m, to maintain a narrow, often barless, surf against the beach. A foredune backs the beach, then 1 to 2 km of active white sand dunes. The main access, car park and beach boat launching are all located at the very northern end of the beach, which is also backed by a high tide boulder beach.

A popular area both for launching boats and to fish the inner reefs from the beach.

Anxious Bay
Anxious Bay has a white sandy beach broken only by Walkers Rocks and one other small rocky outcrop. It stretches north some 38kms towards Talia Caves. Access to the section of beach from Walkers Rocks to Talia Caves is limited to four wheel drive vehicles only.

This beach offers excellent beach fishing for Salmon and the occasional Tailor or Mulloway.

Go via the direct route or take the alternate scenic drive to Anxious Bay.

There is magnificent coastal scenery, top beach fishing for Whiting and a concrete ramp for boat fishermen. This provides access to these waters and those of nearby Waldegrave Island.

Elliston
Elliston Caravan Park is popular a base camp for fishing enthusiasts. The Family Parks chain member is well placed in relation to a multitude of fishing spots. These include jetty or beach. Boats can be launched from

Anxious or Venus Bay. Catches include many varieties of fish - Australia Salmon, Mulloway, King George Whiting and Garfish, Trevally and Tommy Ruff.

The Spencer Gulf and Bight waters teem with fish including snapper and King George whiting and there are plenty of opportunities to hire a charter boat.

Eyre Peninsula beach fishing
Eyre Peninsula beach fishing



The Eyre Peninsula is a vast, ruggedly beautiful region which stretches from Whyalla in the east to the Western Australian border over more than 1000 kilometres. The Coffin Bay area is a Mecca for anglers fishing from boats, off the beach, on the rocks or from a jetty.


Arno bay

The area was settled by pastoralists in 1863 and initially named ‘Salt Creek Cove’. The small town was proclaimed in 1882 under the name of ‘Bligh’, after Captain William Bligh. The town became a small port and a jetty was built in 1880. The port serviced the local farming districts, importing super phosphate fertilisers and exporting locally grown cereal crops. By 1911 the town had grown substantially, with a school, post office, hotel and hall having been established.

The town continued to grow as a port until it was exporting 11,000 tonnes of grain in 1940. In the same year, the town’s name was officially changed to ‘Arno Bay’, after the Aboriginal name for a local sandhill well.

The period of high export came to an end in 1963 when the storage silos were built, and ocean shipping became redundant to the large trucks that were now the main mechanism of transport.

This signalled the end of Arno Bay as a port, causing the population to drop slowly, eventually leading to its current position as a tourist fishing town.

The fishing like other places on Eryre Peninsula is fantastic wether from the jetty or for the boaty`s chasing those big salmon.

Ceduna
The fishing conditions in Ceduna are just about perfect for amateur anglers as well as experienced and seasoned fishermen. That is why Ceduna is such an increasingly popular fishing spot, of course! As far as the fishing conditions go, all you really have to worry about is the wind. That’s right…the wind! When you are fishing in Ceduna’s waters, you will normally notice some prevailing winds coming in from the west, and the onshore and southerly winds are generally going to get a bit stronger as the day goes on. That’s it! Other than that, you really have nothing to worry about with regard to the fishing conditions, especially if you are on a fishing boat!

Any good fisherman full well understands that having the right bait can either make or break his fishing success. When it comes to the idyllic waters of Ceduna, there are actually just two kinds of bait that make for effective bait in these waters: squid and a type of bivalve shellfish that the locals lovingly refer to as “Razor Fish.” Squid is an effective and all-purpose bait since it can be readily and easily obtained in just about any supermarket or sports store in the little town. What the locals affectionately know as “Razor Fish” is actually a bivalve shellfish that is great for catching the area’s local delicacy, which is King George Whiting. This type of local delicacy has a reputation for being caught quite often on South Australia’s far west coast; you’ll need a fishing boat to get to these.

Aside from King George Whiting, there is also an abundance of other kinds of fish in Ceduna’s waters. The waters in this spot are usually both calm and sheltered, which makes them ideal places in which to catch salmon, garfish, snook, trevally and tommy ruffs. According to none other than the Sydney Morning Herald, you can also expect to catch leatherjackets, silver drummer, mullet, sweep and mulloway, too. You can even catch your fair share of sharks such as white pointers, hammerheads, bronze whalers, gummy sharks and even school shark.

Port Neil
The fishing here is outstanding. Port Neill is one of the best places for reeling in beautiful Whiting. There is a jetty and a modern boat ramp, to help you get down to the serious stuff of filling your fishing basket

There are mullet and whiting along the beach towards the north, try around the reefs in front of the bowling club around to the ramp for flathead, and I seem to remember blokes fishing for sharks off the ramp point and the next couple around to Back Beach.
Jetty is good for squid, tommies, and snook under the big light on the end at night (if you can get the buggers to bite). I've also seen whiting, mullet, gar, flathead and leatherjacket all pulled up at various points along it.
We used to snorkle off the beaches out to the islands down towards the golf club and got heaps of strongies, leatherjacket and assorted other species. PB was about 36" long strongie with a handspear and it pulled like a freight train. Basically anywhere around there has fish you just have to sort out what they are prepared to bite on.

Locals reported good whiting catches even during the poor tides; the odd rugger snapper was also landed.

The jetty and breakwater continue to produce tommies and squid while half kg salmon came from the beaches and rocks south of Port Neill.

Sir Joseph Banks Group
Of equal significance, however, is Tumby’s proximity to many of lower Eyre Peninsula’s very best fishing locations. We stay in Tumby and fish the Sir Joseph Banks Group, Second Creek and the jetty, but we regularly venture to the surf beaches between Lincoln and Elliston, the pristine waters of Coffin Bay and blue water areas offshore. Rarely do we have to travel more than an hour from our base in Tumby to sample some of the best fishing SA has to offer – something that can’t be said truthfully in many other locations.

Venus Bay
Venus Bay is a large, almost totally land-locked bay and offers excellent boat and jetty fishing all year round. The jetty offers good catches of tommy ruff and trevally for the jetty fishermen. Garfish and mullet are also often caught from the jetty.

Venus bay offers idyllic sheltered waters for small boat fishermen. A concrete slab ramp north of the jetty provides easy access to the sheltered waters for boat fishermen who seek their regular bag of whiting by day and scan the waters just east of the town on a hot summer's night for flounder.

Outside the Venus bay entrance is an absolute mecca for the fishermen, if you have a boat large enough to get outside the heads. These waters fishing grounds for whiting, trevally, salmon, flathead, snapper and shark.

Venus Bay is a large, almost totally land-locked bay and offers excellent boat and jetty fishing all year round. The jetty offers good catches of tommy ruff and trevally for the jetty fishermen. Garfish and mullet are also often caught from the jetty.

Venus bay offers idyllic sheltered waters for small boat fishermen. A concrete slab ramp north of the jetty provides easy access to the sheltered waters for boat fishermen who seek their regular bag of whiting by day and scan the waters just east of the town on a hot summer's night for flounder.

Outside the Venus bay entrance is an absolute mecca for the fishermen, if you have a boat large enough to get outside the heads. These waters fishing grounds for whiting, trevally, salmon, flathead, snapper and shark.

A couple of great references on the old King George’s are:
Streaky Bay
Streaky Bay, provides a wide variety of locations, so that adverse weather conditions may be countered by travelling to a more sheltered area. Jetty fishermen will be rewarded with catches of tommy ruff, salmon trout and snook. During the summer months of November and December, snapper can be caught.

The shores of the Bay and nearby Perlubie Beach offer excellent beach fishing for whiting and nearby Back Beach, Speeds Point, High Cliff and the Granites offer surf fishing for salmon. Launching facilities are provided for boat fishermen and this vast expanse of water is a fishermen's paradise returning catches of King George whiting, snapper, trevally, snook, salmon trout and garfish.

Smooth Pool, with its natural breakwater, is a great picnic spot for the family and offers fishing for trevally, whiting and salmon. Sceale Bay and Baird Bay to the south which have boat launching facilities are renowned for their whiting grounds and are popular destinations for visitors.

Port Lincoln
Port Lincoln is famous for the Bluefin Tuna, which migrate along the southern end of the peninsula from February through to May. It is the only place in Australia where you can try your luck fishing around the tuna cages. To fish offshore for tuna a boat of at least 6 metres is required.

Other blue water species caught include Samson, Kingfish, Morwongs and Snapper.

The Lincoln National Park is surrounded by pristine waters and has plenty of camping sites. A great place to chase Salmon on the surf beaches, King George Whiting, Squid, Tommies, Snook, Trevally and Garfish in the bays.

At the main wharf and in the Marina, salmon trout are on the bite especially when a small amount of berley is used as an attractant. Porter Bay has mixed species including squid, garfish, whiting and salmon trout.

Larger salmon are hit or miss along the south coast with best place being Millers Hole; Wisemans and the Salmon Hole are hit or miss.

Boat anglers are getting whiting along the north shore, Boston Island and at a variety of spots between Donnington and Taylors. Further afield there are whiting at Thistle and nannygai around the islands deep in Thorny Passage.

Fishing for yellowfin whiting has been good along the town foreshore and jetty, fish have been taken on a variety of baits including worms, prawns and nippers; successful rigs are light running sinkers with a size 6 hook.

There are some large whiting at the southern end of Louth Island as well as Bolingbroke. The Louth Jetty has some squid and on odd occasions King George whiting.

Whyalla

What Whyalla is  famous for is snapper. Not your average pinky, rugger or squire, but big snapper the size many of us keen anglers only dream of.

There are plenty of them when they are on the bite. Fisheries measure their schools in the tonnes from the air in light aircraft and it is not unusual to have the water pink with 50 tonnes of reds migrating up the gulf.

ARTIFICIAL REEFS
So, how do so many big snapper inhabit what is a relatively barren gulf, void of any large natural reef structure?

Bodies, car bodies that is and lots of them.

Over the past 60 years while the steelworks were churning out raw metal materials for the manufacturing industry in this country, the workers there were getting the remnants of the product they no doubt had a hand in as far as initial manufacture, and sinking it into the gulf.

This has resulted in masses of car bodies but also caravans, truck cabs, old boats small and large, fridges, freezers, washing machines and anything else of substantial structure, being committed to the depths, and in water not overly deep in some cases. I have fished a neap tide where in 20 odd feet of water I could count eight brown lumps on the bottom which are part of the 30 car bodies on that particular drop.

Yep, its illegal but without this artificial structure the snapper would no doubt bypass the gulf. Over the years, successive governments have allowed prawn trawlers to tear down natural reefs and corals. This is where the schools of fish held up as they travelled up the gulf each year to spawn in the warm shallows.

Port Kenny
Port Kenny is a small township situated on the Flinders Highway, between Elliston and Streaky Bay. It overlooks beautiful Venus Bay and caters for the needs of the surrounding mixed farms, local fishing industry and holiday makers.

It is the perfect base for excellent jetty or boat fishing. Port Kenny is also renowned for an abundance and variety of fish such as garfish, snook, flounder, trevally, King George whiting and tommies. If it's surfing you enjoy, the nearby surf beaches are fast-gaining a widespread reputation for both board riding and fishing, with good catches of large salmon being the norm all year-round.

Facilities include a hotel (with accommodation), bed and breakfast and caravan park, fuel outlet, takeaway, post office and general store which offers 24 hour fuel service and all your fishing and daily needs.

Attractions close to Port Kenny include Baird Bay, Murphy's Haystacks, Point Labatt Sea Lion Colony, Talia Caves and the Venus Bay Conservation Park.
All offer unspoilt natural flora, with magnificent views of the bay and
Smokey Bay
Smoky Bay offers excellent jetty fishing for garfish, whiting, tommy ruff, trevally, snook and blue crabs. A concrete ramp is available and boat fishermen are rewarded with similar catches but also including snapper at certain times of the year. Decres and Laura Bays, further north, are locations offering excellent boat fishing, however launching facilities are limited.

Smoky Bay's Facilities

Shops: General store & Eftpos
Fuel: yes
Boat Ramp: yes
Mechanical: Repair Shop
Medical: On-Call Nursing Service
Transport: Bus Service available
Accommodation: Caravan park - no Eftpos - no linen

Smoky Bay Attractions

Swimming
Fishing - Whiting, Flathead, Snook and Garfish

Southern Right Whales

Come and visit the Bunda Cliffs and be in awe of the spectacular scenery and the beautiful Southern Right Whales between May and September. There is an entry fee to the whale viewing platform during May to September and a gold coin donation entry fee when the whale watching season is finished.

Whale Watching Charter Flights

Thirty minute whale watching charter flights are available from an airstrip located next to the Nullabor Roadhouse.
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